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Protect your PC against malicious software

Posted by on Oct 21, 2016 in Computer Applications, Games |

You must have had to deal with malicious software in the past since you found this article. Indeed, we have all had to deal with malware, even though our well-paid anti-virus software was active. Anti-virus software is useful, but it can’t stop all kinds of malware, and therefore it won’t protect your PC from all external threats.

This isn’t something new as everyone knows that anti-virus has its limitations. There are other ways through which you can increase the protection of your PC and make it almost malware-proof. Some of these tricks require advanced knowledge of the PC and its options. If you don’t have the knowledge to set those defenses up, then seek assistance from people who are versatile with computers.

Basic anti-malware protection tips

Very few people install a firewall, and even fewer of those people utilize all of its options. The latest PCs come with a pre-installed firewall. People don’t touch it, and it stays dormant while performing its essential functions. This software is very versatile when it comes to protection from web-based malware. You can set it to block all types of data transfer from the Web. In that case, you will be the one that will have to authorize every data transfer, including cookies as well.

Installation of the anti-virus software is mandatory if you want to protect your PC. It does have its flaws, and it slows down the processing speed of the PC, but it provides excellent protection against certain malware.

Using complex passwords may be boring, but it does help with the security. You can find a lot of programs that crack passwords and the complexity of the password determines whether the program will be successful or not. A program like that will require around 20 hours to crack a simple password that contains a word or several numbers. But if you mix words and figures as well as capital letters then the program will take several days, or even a month to crack that password. No one is patient enough for that.

Some additional ways to protect your PC

Never use generic passwords that you get from the site. A skilled hacker can crack a password like that in less than an hour. Whenever you create an account on a site and share your personal data, be sure to change the password you are given. Use a complex password that has numbers and letters, capital letters and other signs.

Spam, both in emails and social networks, carries malicious malware. This malware may be a virus that will destroy your system, software that will slow down your computer or spyware that will transfer your personal data to someone else. Never open spam messages, no matter what they say.

The latest type of spam are the messages on social networks like Facebook. Those messages contain files that require unzipping. Once you do that, the malware is free to do anything with your system. Don’t touch those files. Whenever someone messages you something that looks suspicious, ask them about it. There is a good chance that they didn’t send it and that it is virus.

Protect your USB flash drive against viruses

Posted by on Sep 14, 2016 in Computer Applications, Games |

Do you remember diskettes? The floppy drives that are just about obsolete and a thing of the past? These were the biggest virus spreaders in their day.

If you had a clean computer, there was no other way for a virus to enter your computer, but through the floppy.

The Internet changed that a bit, but nowadays it is unlikely that you get infected from the Internet if you have a decent virus scanner and a firewall. If your internet provider is good and you are behind a router, then there is almost no way a hacker will bother to enter your machine.

But flash drives travel around like the diskettes of the past used to and the most common threat nowadays is to get infected by putting such a virus infested USB stick into your machine.

What can you do? One of the most likely carriers of infections on a USB Flash drive is the autorun.Inf file paired with the auto-run option of the system that automatically opens such files without a prompt.

It can be very easily remedied with a handy free utility called USB Vaccine by Panda Security. Downloadable for free from their web site, the Panda USB Vaccine disables the autorun feature on the computer you run it on and on any USB drive you select it to vaccinate.

You can, of course, re-enable the function in your computer at a later time just as easily. You should note, however that the USB drive that is vaccinated cannot be reversed and accept autorun again, the change is permanent. With this little vaccination, you can fix your flash drive that you intend to carry around with you.

What shall you do if you do not want to remove that capability, but would still like to carry your USB around?

The solution is another little program that is called Protect My Disk. This program copies a little folder onto your disk that will prevent any program to install an autorun.Inf file in future and remove any such existing files as well.

What is different here, is the fact that this program has the capability of restoring your drive at a later point. After running the Protect My Disk program, you can take your USB flash drive anywhere else and not run the risk of getting infected.

While the files that you copy on that drive may still have dangerous properties, none of the files will auto-execute.

Is my USB flash drive now safe?

If the data on your USB drive should not be erased and you do not want any other data to enter your USB drive, unless you directly specify so, you may also use one of the existing write protection utilities that make your USB drive read-only.

Whilst such programs remove your capability to put something onto your USB drive when away, they also protect you from accidental infection other than the mentioned autorun. Inf routine. All above programs are available for download online. No driver installation is necessary.

Watchdogs Are Back with a new Sequel

Posted by on Aug 18, 2016 in Computer Applications, Games |

Those who witnessed the amazing presentations at the E3 Convention Centre in Los Angeles know that there are some great game titles to be expected in 2016 and 2017.

Most of them we have seen or at least heard of, but one, in particular, was not expected.

We are talking of course about Watch Dogs 2. This time, Aiden is not the main protagonist but his work from the previous storyline is heard of and recognized as a contribution to their cause that is focusing on bringing down ctOS 2.0 and the government anti-hacking organization known as Blume.

What we know about the plot so far.

In this sequel, the story is set in California, Los Angeles, as you take control of Marcus Holloway a computer genius, who is accused by Blume of hacking operations that he wasn’t involved in.

Shortly after the accusation, Marcus is contacted by DedSec operatives and recruited. DedSec also informs him about Blume’s previous mischief in Chicago regarding the usage of ctOS system.

So as we can see, Aiden’s and T-Bone’s actions from the previous chapters of the game inspired DedSec members to continue to fight corruption in the system.

What can we expect from the gameplay itself?

The gameplay is not totally changed, but rather redeveloped using the old system of profiling in a new and advanced way. Using the Profiler system has changed in a way that it is no longer represented in a square from which you operate.

Now you can choose your actions like hack car, hack a phone or any other piece of technology available for manipulation through hacking, by selecting the shape of it as everything turns black.

In this case, hackable objects are highlighted so it is more obvious what can be interacted with and what not. New vehicles and equipment are also available in the California Bay Area so players will be granted with more freedom in completing their tasks.

For example, Marcus has a drone that he can control, which can monitor the surroundings as well as interact by hacking cameras, security systems, and every available electronic device. This brings more to the covert and tactical angle of the game, as players can explore the vicinity by staying hidden under cover.

Game release, system requirements, and other related information.

This game, as announced by Ubisoft’s team, will be available from November 15th for PC, Xbox One and PlayStation 4. Minimum system requirements are at least a dual core processor running on 3.0GHz, 6 GB of RAM, a graphic card equivalent or better than Nvidia GeForce GTX460 and 25 GB of free space for the game itself.

As no official system requirements are announced, this is what should be required to run the game and play it without low framerates.

The game will also support a multiplayer option, so you will be able to team up with other members of DedSec, controlled by your friends and complete the main objective and various side quests. The gameplay from E3 conference provided extremely interesting gameplay so we expect a lot from this sequel.